Fishing Guide

If the fish on your line is very large and it happens to turn around as you are bringing it in, just let it go. You won’t be able to reel it in; the line isn’t long enough. Next time this happens, give it a little more time before you reel in the fish.

Once you have hooked a fish and it starts getting closer to your boat, drop your rod and reel. It should be at waist level. In case the fish swims under your boat, place the tip of your rod in the water and follow the fish. Watch the fish if you can and wait until it gets tired. When it is tired it will roll to its side.

The best time to fish for most types of fresh water fish is at dawn and dusk. Get up early and start fishing the banks of a river, lake or pond, as the sun rises or sets. Also, depending on the time of year, observe the type of insect that is dominant, then try to match your lure to the insect.

Remain as quiet as possible when you are trying to catch a fish. Fish do not like a lot of noise, and if you are being noisy, they are going to swim away from you. Keep any talking down to a minimum. If you have a radio on, keep the volume low.

The key to bringing a fish in is to follow its movement. You will notice decreased movement up until the point that the fish flops onto his side. That tells you that the fish has grown tired and can now be reeled in. Until you actually see the fish physically roll over on its side, you don’t want to pull your line.

Be patient! When it comes to good fishing, patience really is important. Do not expect to make a big catch the first hour you are there. Bring something with you to keep you occupied, a radio or a book, if you plan on fishing for a long time. Remember, good things come to those who wait.

Fishing is something people have done and enjoyed for many years and it will continue to be enjoyed by many in the future. Bring these tips along the next time you go fishing. Try them out and see if you catch more fish than usual.